Workplace Profiles

2021 Thriving Workplace Score

Rank

#3

of 19

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

67.0/100

-0.1

67.0

-0.1

0
100

The Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Industry includes scientific research, architectural, engineering, legal, accounting, advertising, market research, consulting, veterinary and computer system design services.

Graph – Thriving Score for the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Industry over time

Industry Thriving Score: Progress over Time

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services ranked 3rd (out of 19) in terms of workplace mental health and wellbeing in 2021. It scored 67.0 as their overall thriving score, which is above the national average of 65.6. Growth is seen from 2020 to 2021 in the policy and capability domains, which speaks to positive changes to mental health being explored and documented. With over half (53%) of individuals reporting the workplace is supportive of the workers’ mental health, coupled with declines across connectedness, culture and leadership, embedded positive leadership practices are a good next step.

What can you do?

Leaders set the tone of their workplace, and leveraging leadership capability and trust is a great way to create positive and thriving workplace cultures. Leaders are uniquely placed to actively listen to the thoughts and experiences of their teams and to influence policy change in ways that meet the needs of their people.

This graph depicts the Thriving Score for the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Industry over time

Graph – Thriving Score for the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Industry over time

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Within this industry…

52.0%

of workers have experienced a mental health condition* in the last 12 months
*Refer to Technical report notes

53.0%

of workers feel their workplace is highly supportive of workers’ mental health and wellbeing

70.8%

of workers plan to stay with their workplace for the next 12 months

Psychosocial Risk Profile

Psychosocial risks are workplace operations that increase stress and reduce mental wellbeing.
Read more

Inappropriate workload

2.7

Low recognition

2.4

Poor change management

2.4

Poor management support

2.3

Low job control

2.2

Poor role clarity

2.2

Poor workplace relationships

2.1

Poor working environment

1.9

Traumatic events

2.0

Key:

Table – Psychosocial Risk Profile for Professional, Scientific and Technical Services industry

Highest Psychosocial Risk

The highest psychosocial risk facing the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Industry is inappropriate workload.

How can you manage this risk?

Workplaces in this industry can focus on managing workload levels of employees and making sure individuals are valued and recognised for their work.

Manage inappropriate workload through implementing good job design, alleviating time pressures and job crafting for success. For example:

  • Ensure adequate work breaks are taken where possible where workloads are high and/or explore professional growth opportunities to refine and develop skills where workloads are low
  • Regularly review workloads and ensuring employees are qualified to complete tasks assigned and/or have adequate work to keep them engaged and motivated
  • Consider rotating tasks that are highly repetitive or monotonous
  • Provide ongoing training and support to employees who interact directly with customers and clients and/or providing a buddy or more experienced team member to share their knowledge and skills, which supports connection, culture and recognition
  • Encourage employees to speak up and have input into the timing and order of work, aligning to required outcomes/deadlines
  • Make sure targets are realistic and achievable and allow for employee feedback that would be considered in review, creating trust building culture and connection, and
  • Clearly define how your values, strengths, and passions connect to what you do on a day-to-day basis.

Think about implementing new strategies where there is low recognition and poor role clarity. Through valuing each team member and recognising good work, each individual will feel more connected to the team and be able to see the boundaries of their role. Examples of this may be:

  • Celebrate KPI achievements e.g., weekly team meetings shout outs, certificates at end of month for ‘best of’, leader boards, lunch/coffee voucher or customised trophy
  • Aligning organisational values to team or individual recognition of achievements that reflect these values (monthly/quarterly)
  • Exploring employee ‘wellness days’ or sessions in support of individual wellbeing to also strengthen connectedness and culture. Included in this could be mindfulness sessions, massages, extended lunch breaks, fitness or yoga classes
  • Incorporating regular, immediate and specific feedback via a positive email or in-person chat
  • Aligning organisational values to team or individual recognition of achievements that reflect these values (monthly/quarterly).

Learn More

SuperFriend’s Be Your Best at Work: Positive Strategies for Success course provides individual team members with clear knowledge and practical ways to foster a positively engaged and thriving workplace.

SuperFriend’s Be Your Best at Work: Positive Strategies for Success

Read more about the principles of good job design from SafeWork Australia.

SafeWork Australia: Handbook – Principles of Good Work Design

Listen to Amy Wrzesniewski, Professor of Organisational Behaviour at the Yale School of Management speak about ‘Job Crafting’ and creating meaning at work.

YouTube: Amy Wrzesniewski on Job Crafting

Check out WorkSafe Victoria’s page on how to promote workplace recognition and reward.

WorkSafe Victoria: Work-related stress – low recognition and reward

Check out WorkSafe Victoria’s page on how to promote workplace recognition and reward.

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